Famous Veteran-Johnny Cash

 

 

Our famous veteran, Johnny Cash is the legendary country performer is known as the “Man in Black,” but he was also a man in Air Force blues. Continue reading

3 Tips To Get Your Resumes In The ‘Yes’ Pile

 

 

Resumes, the burning question. The one question that is a recurring theme when we talk to veterans is how do you get your resume in the ‘Yes’ pile and get it reviewed by the hiring manager or recruiter? Don Goodman of Careerealism offers 3 tips to get your resume in the ‘yes’ file. Continue reading

Famous Veteran – Charlton Heston

Charlton Heston was a gunner in B-25’s during WW II. He was a huge proponent for the second amendment
Charlton  Heston headshot.

Famous Veteran: Charlton Heston

“You can take my rifle … when you pry it from my cold dead hands!”

Born John Charles Carter, Charlton Heston’s childhood was spent mostly in wooded areas where he could act in private. His home life was stable until he turned 10, at which point his parents divorced. His mother’s new husband found work in Michigan so the family moved, but they eventually made their way back to Illinois in time for Heston to attend New Trier High School in Chicago. His penchant for acting brought him to join the Winnetka Community Theatre, and eventually win a scholarship to Northwestern University.

By the time the United Stated entered World War II in 1941, Heston enlisted in the Army Air Force. He served primarily as a radio operator and aerial gunner on a B-25 Mitchell. He was stationed in the Alaskan Aleutian Islands as part of the Eleventh Air Force, and never saw combat. His eventual stardom in Hollywood led the military to ask him to narrate classified films designed to instruct servicemembers and employees of the Department of Energy about nuclear weapons. This work required Heston to hold the nation’s highest clearance level at the time, termed Q clearance.

As soon as Heston returned from the war, he and his wife, Lydia Clarke, moved to New York where they became models for artists. After a few years, Heston broke into Broadway with a supporting role in an adaptation of “Antony and Cleopatra.” He continued acting on stage and picked up a few roles in television, but his first break into cinema came in 1950 when he appeared in “Dark City.” His career in Hollywood was prodigious, and he appeared in movies like “Planet of the Apes,” “The Omega Man,” and “The Three Musketeers.” Over the course of his career, he earned an Oscar for Best Lead in “Ben-Hur,” two Golden Globes, and a number of other awards.

While Heston invested a large amount of time in acting, he spent a lot of energy in political activism. During the seventies, he vocally opposed the Vietnam War and was even approached by the Democratic Party to run as a U.S. senator. Despite his strong political feelings, he couldn’t walk away from acting. In the eighties, however, he joined the Republican Party and become a prominent gun rights activist. He eventually became the head of the NRA, and spoke out frequently about the right to bear arms.

Heston lived a long life and was passionate about acting and politics throughout his life.  On April 5, 2008, he passed away due to complications with pneumonia.

Go to www.TADPGS.com, click on the “Looking for People” tab, then view “Veterans Solutions” to see more for information on our Veterans Solutions for Employers. Please join our LinkedIn group, Veterans Hiring Solutions for Veterans and Companies at http://linkd.in/Sg346w. If you have specific questions about hiring veterans or the incentives for doing so, contact me at Ben.Marich@Adeccona.com.

ConocoPhillips is Recruiting Veterans

Transitioning back into civilian life can be a hard task and finding a job after military life can be even more daunting. ConocoPhillips is one company that recognizes the challenges and is recruiting veterans into the workplace.

The oil and gas industry continues to be an area providing hope for veterans. ConocoPhillips is seeking to be the company for veterans seeking work. The company has created a program to help veterans find work within the workplace and has even dedicated part of the website to recruiting vets. Part of the program also partners with Orion International, a military talent management firm, which helps guide veterans through the hiring process.

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Career Advice: “Worrying is a Waste of Imagination”

Even though the economy is looking up, the job market can still be tough, especially for veterans transitioning back into civilian life. Worrying can creep on just about anyone but the added stress of transitioning can make job searching even harder.

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Famous Veterans: Alan Alda

Alan AldaBorn Alphonso D’Abruzzo in New York City on January 28, 1936, Alan Alda was exposed to show business at an early age. His father was a stage and screen actor and his mother was a former showgirl.At age seven, Alda was diagnosed with polio. He was confined to his bed for two years while undergoing medical treatment. To keep himself occupied, he read voraciously and listened to the radio. Continue reading

Famous Veterans: Johnny Carson

Johnny Carson
Host of the Tonight Show
Johnny CarsonThe king of late-night TV for over three decades, Johnny Carson was born in Corning, Iowa, on October 23, 1925. He was working as a theater usher when World War II began. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy on June 8, 1943, as an apprentice seaman enrolled in the V-5 program, which trained Navy and Marine pilots.He hoped to train as a pilot, but was sent instead to Columbia University for midshipman training. He performed magic for classmates on the side. Continue reading

Easy Ways to Support Our Troops and Their Families

 

As we plan our Memorial Day holiday, consider a few simple and inexpensive ways that you and your family can serve the military and their families. Taking a few minutes from a hectic schedule to show appreciation and kindness to someone serving our country will not only bless you, it will also pay tribute to those who have gone before us and made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. We could all use an extra dose of kindness and appreciation these days, wouldn’t you agree?

Don’t let perfection get in the way of progress. Jump in and try one or more of these suggestions or come up with your own plan! Continue reading

Famous Veteran: Tony Bennet

 

 

Tony Bennett
Singer
Tony BennettBorn Anthony Dominick Benedetto in New York City on August 3, 1926, Bennett was the youngest of three children and was already performing at the age of six. He was called up for the Army in 1944 during WWII. After basic training, Bennett was assigned to the 63rd Infantry Division (the “Blood and Fire” Division) where he served in France and Germany.

Fallen But Not Forgotten: The True Story of American War Hero Ed W. Freeman

Major Ed Freeman Ed “Too Tall” Freeman was a Master Sergeant in the Army Corps of Engineers, who fought in Korea as an infantryman. He took part in the Battle of Pork Chop Hill and was one of only 14 survivors out of 257 men who made it through the opening stages of the battle.

For his Korean service, Ed was awarded a Battlefield Commission. The Commission allowed him the opportunity to apply to flight school, but at 6’4″, the 6’2″ height restriction prevented him from eligibility, earning him the nickname “Too Tall.”

In 1955, the Army’s height regulations changed, allowing Ed to attend flight school. He earned his wings at Ft. Rucker, Alabama and began flying fixed-wing aircraft, and eventually helicopters.

1st CalvaryAfter logging thousands of hours in choppers, Ed was sent to Vietnam in 1965, assigned to the 1st Calvary Division (Airmobile). He was second in command of a sixteen-helicopter unit responsible for carrying infantrymen into battle.

On Nov. 14, 1965, Ed’s helicopters carried a battalion into the Ia Drang Valley for what became the first major confrontation between large forces of the American and North Vietnamese armies.

Back at base, Ed and the other pilots received word that the soldiers they had dropped off were taking heavy casualties and running low on supplies. In fact, the fighting was so fierce that Medevac helicopters refused to pick up the wounded.

First Calvary Division AirmobileWhen the commander of the helicopter unit asked for volunteers to fly into the battle zone, Freeman alone stepped forward. He was joined by his commander, and the two of them began several hours of flights into the contested area.

Because their small emergency-landing zone was just one hundred yards away from the heaviest fighting, their unarmed and lightly armored helicopters took several hits.

Ed Freeman StoryIn all, Freeman carried out fourteen separate rescue missions, bringing in water and ammunition to the besieged soldiers and taking back dozens of wounded, some of whom wouldn’t have survived if they hadn’t been evacuated. For these actions, Ed was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor on July 16, 2001, by President George W. Bush for his “conspicuous gallantry” during his many rescue missions. .

Ed passed away on August 20, 2008 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho, due to complications from Parkinson’s Disease. He was 80 years old.
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In March 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a resolution designating the U.S. Postal Service facility located at 103 West Main Street in McLain, Mississippi, as the ‘Major Ed W. Freeman Post Office’.
Laurie Cox is a Veteran Advocate and author of the Veterans blog VFW lady.

Go to www.TADPGS.com to view our job openings and join our LinkedIn group, Veterans Hiring Solutions for Veterans and Companies at http://linkd.in/Sg346w. If you have specific questions about issues affecting you, your benefits, your dependents etc., feel free to send them to me personally at Ben.Marich@Adeccona.com, and I will try to help you.